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low libido

Lack of Female Sexual Desire: Why Does it Occur and How to Treat It?

Although society moves forward in many ways, there are some issues that remain taboo. One of them, of which women talk little, is the lack of sexual desire. Sexual problems are much more common than we think: it is estimated that between 40% and 50% of women have suffered at least one, regardless of age. Of all the dysfunctions, the lack of desire and/or arousal stands out as the most common and, although it can be treated, only a third of women make an appointment to sexologist in Delhi.

Today we want to break these clichés and encourage all women to consult with a sexologist doctor in Delhi if they find themselves in this situation, as low sexual desire can have many causes and most are avoidable.

WHAT IS MEANT BY A LOW SEX DRIVE?

Sexuality is a very important part of life. In fact, the World Health Organization (WHO) defines sexual health as the “sexually related state of physical, emotional, mental and social well-being.” In this sense, it is not only about reproduction but also with pleasure and intimacy, since it directly influences the quality of life of people.

Not wanting sex or feeling less than your partner is not reasons to think of low libido, but it may simply be that you find yourself at different times of your life cycle, with different needs.

However, if it is a subject that bothers or causes frustration, these three clues may indicate if there is a dysfunction of desire:

  • You have no interest in any type of sexual activity, including self-stimulation.
  • You never have sexual thoughts or fantasies.
  • This absence of desire causes disappointment.

WHY IS THERE A LOW SEX DRIVE?

Lack of sexual desire is often related to physiological, psychological, sociocultural influences and interpersonal relationships. It is often more common in postmenopausal adults, but, although less known, it also affects young women. In this sense, it is important to eliminate certain myths, such as that with age tends to decrease sexual activity. According to the best sexologist in Delhi, 80% of women up to 65 years of age regularly perform sexual practices.

In general, there are many explanations for a decrease in sexual desire, some of the most common:

  • Use of certain medications, such as oral contraceptives or chemotherapy. In this case, it is necessary to consult with a doctor to look for alternatives or additional treatments.
  • Some diseases, such as diabetes or hypertension.
  • Discomfort when having sexes from dryness and pain in the genital area, it is advisable to use lubricants and moisturizers or physiotherapy of the muscles of the pelvis.
  • Stress or depression. It is recommended to consult with a doctor the need for psychological therapy or treatment.
  • Pregnancy, postpartum and when you’re breast-feeding.
  • Menopause.
  • Low self-esteem.

TIPS FOR REGAINING SEX DRIVE

First, it is necessary to know the reason for the lack of libido to look for an adapted solution. To do this, it is advisable to consult with a sex specialist in Delhi, who will evaluate all the causes, both the most obvious and the least, to offer personalized treatment.

There are some general recommendations for increasing sex drive that may be helpful:

  • Reduce stress and avoid fatigue.
  • Improve communication with your partner. Talking about each other’s needs, insecurities and preferences can be helpful.
  • Improve the quality of your sex. Pleasurable experiences improve the desire and perspectives of subsequent sexual encounters. Therefore, it will be beneficial that you spend time in the preliminaries, look for what stimulates you more and makes you enjoy.
  • Consult with a healthcare professional about taking medicines.

If you feel a low sex drive, break the ice and talk to your sexologist in Delhi. With these tips and your help, you’ll be on the road to enjoying a full sex life again.

Sexual-Activation

Sexual Activation Disorders

These disorders previously referred to as inhibited sexual activation are divided into:

1) Erectile dysfunction in men characterized by a recurring and persistent partial or complete inability to achieve or maintain an erection until sexual intercourse is completed;

2) Sexual activity disorder in women characterized by a recurring and persistent partial or complete inability to maintain sexual excitation accompanied by moistening and swelling of the genitalia until sexual intercourse is completed.

The diagnosis takes into account the focus, intensity, and duration of sexual activity in which the subject participates. If the stimulation is inadequate for focus, intensity or duration, the diagnosis should not be set. Below are the diagnostic criteria for activation disorders.

Diagnostic criteria for erectile dysfunction in men:

A. Or 1) or 2):

  1. Stable or actual partial or complete inability of a man to achieve or maintain an erection until the sexual intercourse is completed;
  2. stable or repetitive absence of a subjective sense of sexual arousal or satisfaction of a man during sexual activity,

B. Manifestation only during another Disorder of Axis 1 (non-sexual dysfunction) such as severe depression.

Diagnostic criteria for sexual activity disorder in women:

A. Or 1) or 2):

  1. Stable or actual partial or complete inability to maintain sexual excitement, accompanied by moistening and swelling of the genital organs, until sexual intercourse is completed;
  2. Persistent or repetitive absence of a subjective sense of sexual arousal or satisfaction of a woman during sexual activity.

B. Manifestation only during another Disorder of Axis 1 (non-sexual dysfunction), such as severe depression.

Women

sexual activation disorder

The prevalence of female sexual disorders is usually underestimated. Women who have dysfunction in the phase of excitation also usually have a violation of the orgasm phase. In one study conducted on relatively happy couples, it has been found that 33% of women have sexual arousal.

Female sexual inhibition is associated with many psychological factors. Psychological conflicts can be expressed through the inhibition of sexual arousal and orgasm. In some women, disorders of the phase of the violation are associated with dyspareunia or with a lack of desire.

Physiological studies of dysfunction have shown that a hormonal pattern can contribute to the reactivity of women who suffer from a function disorder in the excitation phase. Sexologist in Delhi found that women with normal reactivity are particularly prone to sexual intercourse before menstruation. Women with dysfunction usually experience most sexual anxiety immediately after menstruation or during ovulation. Changes in levels of testosterone, estrogen, prolactin, and thyroxin also affect anxiety disorder in women.

Men

Erectile-Dysfunction

An erection disorder in men is also called erectile dysfunction or impotence. In the case of primary impotence, a person can never achieve an erection sufficient for the introduction of the penis into the vagina. With secondary impotence, a person successfully reaches an erection that is sufficient for sexual intercourse, in some periods of his sexual life, whereas at another time he can not do this. In selective impotence, a man can, under certain circumstances, commit intercourse, and in others, he does not; for example, a function may be normal when dealing with a prostitute, but with a spouse, there is impotence.

Secondary impotence is observed in 10 – 20% of all men. Sexologist doctor in Delhi often heard these complaints from his patients. Among all men treated for sexual dysfunction, more than 50% is referred to as impotence as the main complaint. Primary impotence is a rare disorder that occurs in 1% of men up to 35 years of age. With age, the number of cases of impotence increases. Among adults of young age, it occurs in 8% of the population. Sex specialist in Delhi notes that, at the age of 80, 75% of men are impotent. Sex doctor in Delhi notes that the fear of impotence is felt by all men over 40, which, according to researchers, reflects the male fear of the loss of libido with age. However, age varies in different ways on the sexual function of different people; more important than age in itself for normal sexual function, the presence of a sexual partner.

Etiologically, impotence may be due to organic factors, psychological factors, or a combination of both. Many studies are devoted to the analysis of the ratio of psychological and organic impotence. Some sexologists in Delhi report that the frequency of organic impotence among patients undergoing treatment in a hospital is 75-85%. Others believe that these same patients have not been adequately psychologically tested and argue that more than 90% of patients suffer from impotence, which is caused psychologically. Below are listed the organic causes of impotence or diseases that cause erectile dysfunction:

  • Infectious or parasitic diseases – elephantiasis, epidemic mumps;
  • Cardiovascular diseases – atherosclerosis, aneurysm of the aorta, heart failure;
  • Kidney and urological diseases – Peyronie’s disease, chronic renal insufficiency, hydrocele or varicocele;
  • Liver disease – cirrhosis (usually associated with alcoholism);
  • Lung disease – respiratory failure; genetic diseases – Kline-Felter syndrome, congenital or structural violation of the penis;
  • Disorders related to nutrition – malnutrition, lack of vitamins; endocrine disorders-diabetes mellitus,
  • Dysfunction of the pituitary-adrenal axis – testicle, acromegaly, Addison’s disease, chromosomal FOBN adenoma, neoplasia of the adrenal glands, myxedema, hypertension rheodism;
  • Neurological diseases – multiple sclerosis, transverse myelitis, tremorous paralysis, epilepsy of the frontal lobe, diseases of the spinal cord, central nervous system tumors, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, peripheral nervous system disease, general paresis, spinal cord dysfunction;
  • Pharmacological effects – alcohol and other substances that cause addiction (heroin, methadone, morphine, cocaine, phenamine, barbiturates), intended for the treatment of drugs (psychotropic substances, antihypertensive, extra genes, antiandrogens);
  • Poisoning – lead, herbicides;
  • Surgical operations – perineal prostatectomy, abdominal-perineal colonectomy, sympathectomy (often prevents ejaculation), aortic ankle-joint anastomosis, radical cystectomy, retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy;
  • Mixed diseases – radiation therapy, pelvic fracture, every serious systemic disease or exhausting condition. antiandrogens);

Side effects of drugs may interfere with sexual function in a variety of ways, both in men and in women. Castration (ovarian or testicle removal) does not always lead to sexual dysfunction depending on the subject. Erection may occur after castration. Reflex arc, excited by stimulation of the internal surfaces of the thighs, acts through the sacral part of the spinal cord to the centers of erection, which causes this phenomenon.

The best sexologist in Delhi described one type of impotence as the result of an inability to reconcile with the feeling of affection or desire for the same woman. Such men can only have sexual intercourse with a woman who is believed to be humiliated. Other factors that can lead to impotence are a punitive superstitious, inability to believe, a feeling that the partner does not meet his desire or that he is not desirable for the partner.